Regulatory amendments related to air emissions of sulphur dioxide and other items

ERO number
013-0903
Notice type
Regulation
Act
Environmental Protection Act, R.S.O. 1990
Posted by
Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change
Notice stage
Decision
Decision posted
Comment period
October 27, 2017 - December 11, 2017 (45 days) Closed

This consultation was open from:
October 27, 2017
to December 11, 2017

Decision summary

We have updated air standards for sulphur dioxide and clarified regulatory requirements, which will help to reduce risks to communities near industrial facilities. 

Decision details

We have updated the sulphur dioxide air standards and introduced Upper Risk Thresholds as part of the regulatory framework to better protect human health and the environment. In addition, we have clarified requirements in the regulation for assessing operating conditions with a focus on addressing emissions of contaminants during transitional operating conditions (TOC) and added a tool to require incident modelling of industrial facilities.

Updated air standards

We made a decision to update the air standards for sulphur dioxide as follows:

  • A 1-hour average air standard of 100 micrograms per cubic metre of air (μg/m3) for sulphur dioxide, based on respiratory morbidity associated with exposure to this substance
  • An annual average air standard of 10 μg/m3 for sulphur dioxide, based on vegetation damage with exposure to this substance

For more information, please see the “Ontario Air Standards for Sulphur Dioxide (SO2)” Decision Document (see link included in this notice).

These air standards are to be incorporated into Schedule 3 of the local air quality regulation (O. Reg. 419/05).  Additionally, these air standards will be used to update the ministry’s “Air Contaminants Benchmarks List: standards, guidelines and screening levels for assessing point of impingement concentrations of air contaminants” which is used in Emission Summary and Dispersion Modelling (ESDM) reports.

The phase-in period for the updated sulphur dioxide air standard will be five years. The air standards will take effect on July 1, 2023.

Upper Risk Thresholds

Upper Risk Thresholds (URT) are used to manage risk of a contaminant during the phase-in of an air standard and also to inform approvals decisions after the air standard takes effect. Facilities are required to notify the ministry if a URT is exceeded and to develop plans to reduce their emissions.

URTs are set out in Schedule 6 for the purposes of section 30 (Requirements if a URT may be exceeded) and section 35 (Site-Specific Standards) of O. Reg. 419/05. The URTs are set at the level of the current sulphur dioxide air standards, namely:

  • a 1-hour URT of 690 μg/m3 for sulphur dioxide, for facilities where section 20 applies.
  • a ½ hour URT of 830 μg/m3 for sulphur dioxide, for facilities where section 19 applies.

The URTs will be phased-in on January 1, 2019.

The addition of sulphur dioxide to Schedule 6 (URTs) is referenced in subsection 15 (2) and the phase-in date is referenced in subsection 18 (3) of the amending regulation (see link included in this notice).

Transitional operating conditions (TOC)

Section 10 of O. Reg. 419/05 requires a facility to model the operating scenario that would result in the highest concentration of a contaminant at a point of impingement that results from a facility’s emission to air. To improve clarity and ensure consistency in how this section is applied, the amendments require facilities to consider the following types of operating scenarios:

  • All facilities are required to assess emissions of all contaminants during normal operations (including operating at maximum design capacity), start-up operating conditions, and shutdown operating conditions;
  • Facilities in the petroleum refining sector identified under NAICS codes 324110 and 324190 are required to also assess emissions of sulphur dioxide during transitional operating conditions related to acid gas flaring; and
  • Any facility, if issued a notice by a Director must assess the operating condition specified in the notice, for the contaminant(s) specified in the notice.

The amendments also include a new provision authorizing the ministry to issue an order and require a facility to assess air emissions from a specific incident that has occurred such as a malfunction or spill.

Comments received

Through the registry

25

By email

24

By mail

0
View comments submitted through the registry

Effects of consultation

The ministry considered all comments received during the comment period in response to the posting. The following sets out the particular concerns that were raised and how the ministry considered them in the development of the final amendments.

Updated air standards

The majority of comments received by the ministry were related to the science-basis used and implementation of the proposed updated sulphur dioxide air standards. For a detailed discussion of the comments and ministry responses, please see the Ontario Air Standards for Sulphur Dioxide (SO2) Decision Document, by following the link included in this notice. In addition, the ministry received oral and written comments prior to the public consultation period, and during earlier stakeholder engagement meetings; please refer to Appendix A of the Decision Document, where they have been summarized and addressed.

Many comments indicated overall support for updating the standards. The ministry’s process for updating the sulphur dioxide standards is consistent with how other new and updated standards have been set under the regulation.

Some comments suggested that the air standard should be set at the same value as the Canadian Ambient Air Quality Standard (CAAQS) for sulphur dioxide. The CAAQS is a target for regional air quality based on consideration both of science and achievability and is not intended as a tool for assessment of a regulated facility. The Ontario regulatory framework relies on air dispersion modelling to assess compliance by identifying the maximum concentration of a contaminant that may result at any location near a regulated facility.

Some comments expressed concerns about setting air standards that may not be technically or economically achievable and that the technology-based compliance approaches available under the regulation create significant communication challenges for regulated facilities. Ontario’s air standards are set at levels protective of human health without regard for achievability. Concerns about achievability issues are addressed through technology-based compliance approaches (site-specific or sector-based technical standards) available under the regulation. These compliance approaches focus on achieving continuous improvement through actions an individual facility can take to reduce emissions to air as much as possible, considering the technology that is available and best operational practices. Economic factors may also be considered. The ministry will continue to work with regulated facilities, local public health offices and others on enhancing communication regarding the various compliance approaches available under the regulation.

Upper Risk Thresholds (URTs)

The regulated community commented that the URT should be set at 10 times the value of the updated sulphur dioxide standard, consistent with other URTs that the ministry has previously set, and that its implementation should coincide with the updated air standard (i.e., 5-year phase-in).

Generally, for substances with non-carcinogenic effects like sulphur dioxide, the URT is set 10-fold higher than the standard. However, the setting of a URT may also include consideration of other effects that may be of concern at higher exposure levels. Such information was considered in setting the URT for SO2. Specifically, since the current 1974 air standard for sulphur dioxide is representative of a concentration which is protective against adverse health effects on the general population but not sensitive populations, the URT is proposed to be set at the level of the existing 1974 sulphur dioxide air standards.

Generally, URTs under O. Reg. 419/05 are not phased-in. However, in order to align with the amendments to clarify TOC, we decided to phase-in the URT on January 1, 2019. This effective date will align with annual ESDM reporting deadline for 2018 calendar year.

Regional application of air standards

The ministry sought input on whether to apply the updated air standards in Southern Ontario only, and have the current air standard apply to Northern Ontario or part thereof. After consideration of the comments received, the ministry will implement the updated sulphur dioxide air standards Ontario-wide, consistent with how other new or updated standards have been implemented since the introduction of O. Reg. 419/05.

The regulatory framework already addresses technical and economic challenges in meeting air standards (through the site-specific or technical standards compliance options). Implementing the updated sulphur dioxide air standards Ontario-wide is scientifically-supportable, supports health equity in the province, and is consistent with the continuous improvement goals of the CAAQS.

Furthermore, applying different standards to Northern and Southern Ontario may create intra-sector competitiveness issues, with different facilities within the same sector faced with different regulatory thresholds.

Lambton Industrial Meteorological Alerts (LIMA)

Ontario Regulation 350: Lambton Industrial Meteorological Alerts (O. Reg. 350: LIMA) was introduced in 1981 to provide increased monitoring and air quality protection for residents in the Sarnia and Corunna communities. If concentrations exceed a certain limit, the Sarnia Lambton Environmental Association will notify the ministry of the initiation of an alert, and advise local area industries of the alert so that they can take action to reduce their sulphur dioxide emissions. As a result of decreasing sulphur dioxide levels in the Sarnia area, a LIMA alert has not been triggered since 2008.

As part of the consultation process, the Ministry sought input on amending the Lambton Industry Meteorological Alert Regulation. The ministry has determined that additional policy analysis and further consultation is required before a decision is made on the future of LIMA and will provide an update at a later time.

Transitional operating conditions

Comments were received indicating overall support for the ministry’s proposal along with suggestions for enhanced public notification of releases during transitional operating conditions, and adoption of reporting rules implemented in other jurisdictions. As well, recommendations were received in support of increased public awareness and education related to the application of O. Reg. 419/05. To address these suggestions the ministry may consider measures outside regulatory amendments including reviewing and updating internal procedures and public-facing processes and documentation, as appropriate.

The ministry received comments expressing concerns with the inclusion of start-up and shutdown operating scenarios in the default compliance assessment for all facilities and contaminants given lack of standardized methodology to estimate emissions, and the cost of assessing such scenarios especially if they occur rarely (e.g., once every ten years). Some comments suggested that start-up and shutdown emissions should be addressed through the environmental compliance approval review process. The assessment of start-up and shutdown is required to ensure that emissions during these operating conditions are appropriately managed. To assess start-up and shutdown emissions, facilities can use a range of emission estimation techniques including emission factors (where available), material balance calculations, or engineering calculations. In accordance with the regulation, if a facility cannot meet the air standard based on start-up/shutdown scenario that occurs rarely, it has the option to refine the modelling and reflect actual operations and emissions that occurred during the previous calendar year.

Comments were received indicating that wording of the proposed acid gas flaring provision lacked clarity and overestimated the amount of acid gas that petroleum refineries can generate and convey to flaring equipment. In addition, comments stated that modelling hypothetical releases during acid gas flaring does not account for facility performance and operational practices aimed at reducing flaring incidents. We revised the wording included in regulatory amendments to capture a realistic maximum operating scenario related to acid gas flaring. Under the main compliance approach within the framework of O. Reg. 419/05, when facilities demonstrate they can meet the air standard, no additional requirements related to operational performance are imposed. Petroleum refineries are expected to meet the air standard when acid gas flaring, and if a facility cannot meet the air standard, it may request an alternative compliance approach.

The ministry received comments recommending that the proposed amendments not proceed due to concerns that they narrow the scope of the current regulation and reduce the ability to protect public safety. In addition, it was suggested that a multi-agency approach be developed for implementing process safety management at industrial facilities in Ontario. The amendments clarify the scope and reflect how the regulation needs to be applied given that current wording in the regulation and supplementary guidance are not compatible and have been inconsistently interpreted and applied. The amendments require that all facilities assess emissions during normal operations, start-up and shutdown. The ministry can also require assessment of additional operating scenarios (including spills and malfunctions) on a case-by-case basis by way of Director notices or incident modelling order. While requirements included in O. Reg. 419/05 are aimed at ensuring that facility emissions meet standards set at levels protective of human health, this approach is not an appropriate framework to address all process safety issues. The ministry takes recommendations on process safety management under advisement and may consider measures outside O. Reg. 419/05 to address this issue.

Comments were received recommending that grounds for a Director notice be changed (either broadened or scoped down) and include input from local communities on releases during transitional operating conditions. The criteria or grounds related to the new Director notices have been established similar to the existing notices in the regulation. These notices can be issued in a preventative manner and the Director can use various types of information including information from the public to support a decision to issue a notice. In response to comments, the ministry broadened the scope of the Director notice to capture a wider range of operating scenarios.

Other information

Sulphur dioxide air standards

Depending on the industrial sector, regulated facilities comply with requirements of the local air quality regulation under either section 19 (Schedule 2 air standards) or section 20 (Schedule 3 air standards). As of February 1, 2020, Schedule 2 standards will be phased out and all regulated facilities will need to comply with section 20 requirements.

Dispersion modelling, as referenced in the Regulation, is used to relate emission rates from a source to resulting point of impingement concentrations of a particular contaminant.

O. Reg. 419/05 details, among other things, modelling requirements for approved dispersion models, ESDM report requirements, notification requirements, phase-in timelines and general prohibitions against exceeding the standards listed in the schedules to the Regulation. For more information, see the ministry website on Rules on Air Quality and Pollution (see link included in this notice).

In addition, updated sulphur dioxide Ambient Air Quality Criteria (AAQCs) will be added to the document Ontario’s Ambient Air Quality Criteria, which can be found on the ministry’s website. AAQCs are for assessment purposes and should not be confused with guideline values or standards under O. Reg. 419/05. AAQCs are most commonly used in environmental assessments, special studies using ambient air monitoring data, and the assessments of general air quality in a community. AAQCs are the basis from which air standards have been derived. See the Decision Document for details (see link included in this notice).

Transitional operating conditions

Facilities should apply the wording in the amended O. Reg. 419/05 to assess emissions from operating conditions. Chapter 8.3 of Guideline A10: Procedure for Preparing an Emission Summary and Dispersion Modelling (ESDM) Report is revoked.

Additional guidance to support the regulatory amendments may be developed as needed. For more information, see the ministry website on Rules on Air Quality and Pollution (see link included in this notice).

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Original proposal

ERO number
013-0903
Notice type
Regulation
Act
Environmental Protection Act, R.S.O. 1990
Posted by
Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change
Proposal posted

Comment period

October 27, 2017 - December 11, 2017 (45 days)

Proposal details

Description of regulation

The Ontario Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change (ministry) is proposing to amend Ontario Regulation 419/05: Air Pollution - Local Air Quality (O. Reg. 419/05 or the “Regulation”) made under the Environmental Protection Act. The proposed amendments would introduce updated air standards for sulphur dioxide and clarify the requirements for assessing operating conditions in O. Reg. 419/05. The proposed amendments are further described below:

 (a) Updated air standards for sulphur dioxide

The ministry is proposing to introduce updated air standards for sulphur dioxide. Two documents have been developed to support the proposed air standard. The “Rationale for the development of Ontario Air Standards for Sulphur Dioxide (SO2)” builds upon the scientific information reviewed in the 2016 “Science Discussion Document on the Development of Air Standards for Sulphur Dioxide (SO2)”.

The proposed regulatory amendments would include updates to the appropriate Schedules in O. Reg. 419/05 including Schedule 3 [Standards With Variable Averaging Periods], Schedule 6 [Upper Risk Thresholds] and Schedule 7 [Contaminants With Updated Standards]. It is proposed that the Regulation would specify that the amendments specific to Schedule 3 would not come into force until an appropriate phase-in date for the updated standards had passed. The phase-in period for the updated sulphur dioxide air standard is proposed to be five years. In addition to a phase-in period for the updated SO2 standards, the ministry is considering whether to apply the standards on a regional basis. Specifically, the ministry is seeking input on whether to apply the updated standards to Southern Ontario and have the current standards apply to Northern Ontario or part thereof. This proposal includes amendments to Schedule 6 for Upper Risk Thresholds (URTs) for sulphur dioxide. No updates to Schedule 2 standards are proposed because Schedule 2 will be phased out on February 1, 2020, before the new sulphur dioxide air standards would take effect.

The rationale for updating the air standards and Ambient Air Quality Criteria (AAQC) for Sulphur Dioxide are discussed below with supporting documents attached (attachments 1 and 2).

(b) Clarification of the requirements for assessing operating conditions

The ministry is also proposing amendments to clarify the requirements for assessing operating conditions in O. Reg. 419/05 with a focus on addressing emissions of contaminants during transitional operating conditions (TOC) such as start-ups, shut downs and some non-routine operations. Proposed regulatory amendments would address emissions of sulphur dioxide, identified as being a key concern in regards to acute health effects, by a requirement for petroleum refineries to model emissions during acid gas flaring. It is proposed that emissions of contaminants during non-routine operating conditions which are designed to occur at the facility be addressed on a case-by-case basis by way of a notice issued by the Director. The proposed amendments would also introduce new tools for the ministry to obtain information on and deal with discharges from air pollution incidents such as malfunctions and spills.

The attached Proposed Amending Regulation (attachment 3) and Discussion Paper (attachment 4) provides additional information on these proposed regulatory amendments. The purpose of the Discussion Paper is to summarize the information collected and reviewed by the ministry to support the development of these regulatory amendments. It contains a description of the rationale for the ministry’s focus on sulphur dioxide and acid gas flaring at petroleum refineries and the introduction of additional tools to require specified operating conditions to be assessed for other facilities on a case by case basis.

Considerations for consequential amendments

As a result of the proposed amendments to the sulphur dioxide air standards, the ministry is also reviewing the need for consequential amendments to Ontario Regulation 350: Lambton Industrial Meteorological Alerts (LIMA). LIMA (O. Reg. 350) was introduced in 1981 to address the impacts of multiple industrial sources of sulphur dioxide in the Sarnia area.For more information on considerations for consequential amendments to LIMA, please see attachment 5.

The ministry is also proposing minor administrative amendments to the regulation which do not relate to sulphur dioxide or transitional operating conditions, such as a few minor clarifications, and corrections to chemical nomenclature.

Purpose of regulation

Regulating air contaminants from industrial sources is a priority in Ontario. Ontario’s local air quality regulation (O. Reg. 419/05: Air Pollution – Local Air Quality) works within the province’s air management framework by regulating air contaminants released into communities by various sources including local industrial and commercial facilities. The ministry regulates contaminants in air to protect human health and the environment. Air standards are used to assess the contributions of contaminants to air by regulated facilities and may trigger investments in best available technologies and practices to reduce air emissions and improve air quality over time.

Sulphur dioxide

The existing standard(s) for sulphur dioxide were originally developed in 1974 and retained in O. Reg. 419/05 when it was promulgated in 2005. Since then, toxicological information has been published and considered in this proposal to update this air standard and AAQC.

The rationale for the air standards are based on the same science used to develop the AAQCs. This proposal also includes amendments to Schedule 6 for Upper Risk Thresholds (URTs) for Sulphur Dioxide.

1. Ambient air quality criteria (AAQCs)

In the standards setting process, the ministry generally first sets ambient air quality criteria (AAQCs) as the preliminary step. AAQCs are non-regulatory values used to evaluate ambient air quality that results from all sources of a contaminant to air. AAQCs are listed in the ministry document entitled, "Ontario's Ambient Air Quality Criteria". The current AAQCs for sulphur dioxide in Ontario are 690, 275 and 55 µg/m3 (micrograms per cubic meter of air) for 1-hour, 24-hour and annual averaging times, respectively. These AAQCs were set based on respiratory effects and damage to vegetation.

Based on the evaluation of the scientific rationale of air guidelines from leading agencies, an examination of current toxicological research information and on the comments from stakeholders, the ministry is proposing the following AAQCs for Sulphur Dioxide:

  • Ten-minute (10-min) average AAQC of 180 μg/m3 (micrograms per cubic metre of air) for Sulphur Dioxide based on the respiratory effects in exposed sensitive populations.
  • One hour (1-hr) average AAQC of 100 μg/m3 (micrograms per cubic metre of air) for Sulphur Dioxide based on the respiratory effects in exposed sensitive populations.
  • Annual (year) average AAQC of 10 μg/m3 (micrograms per cubic metre of air) for Sulphur Dioxide based on the vegetative damage in exposed sensitive species.
2. Air standards fors sulphur dioxide in O. Reg. 419/05

The rationale for the air standards are based on the same science used to develop the AAQCs. Air standards are regulatory values used to evaluate discharges of a contaminant from a facility at a point of impingement (POI). The current half-hour, 1 hour and 24-hour average air standards for Sulphur Dioxide are 830, 690 and 275 μg/m3, respectively. The ministry is proposing the following air standards for Sulphur Dioxide to replace these existing air standards:

  • One hour (1-hr) standard of 100 μg/m3 (micrograms per cubic metre of air) for Sulphur Dioxide based on the respiratory morbidity in exposed sensitive populations. 
  • Annual (year) standard of 10 μg/m3 (micrograms per cubic metre of air) for Sulphur Dioxide based on the vegetative damage in exposed sensitive species.

The annual and 1 hour standards are proposed to be incorporated into Schedule 3 of O. Reg. 419/05.

Transitional operating conditions

Section 10 of O. Reg. 419/05 requires a facility to model the operating scenario that would result in the highest concentration of a contaminant at a point of impingement that the facility is capable of.  It has been identified that section 10 of the Regulation and related guidance in Guideline A10: Procedure for Preparing an Emission Summary and Dispersion Modelling (ESDM) Report were being inconsistently interpreted and that clarification was needed. Providing clear rules would promote consistent interpretation and application of Section 10 by the regulated community, air practitioners and ministry staff when preparing and reviewing ESDM reports. It would also provide a better depiction of a facility’s compliance with air standards and whether there is the potential for adverse effects for certain operating conditions.

The proposed amendments clarify that all facilities will need to consider scenarios that include start-up and shut-down and when the facility is operating at its maximum design capacity. All other scenarios, when a facility is operating normally, will also need to be considered.

Sulphur dioxide is a contaminant that may cause acute health effects if a person is exposed to elevated emissions over short periods of time such as emissions that may occur during TOC scenarios. Petroleum refineries are of particular concern as high levels of sulphur dioxide can be emitted as a result of acid gas flaring (that is flaring of process gases that contain sulphur). A new provision of the regulation would require that acid gas flaring from petroleum refineries be added to the operating scenarios noted above for modelling to determine compliance with the sulphur dioxide standard.

To supplement the proposed amendments to section 10 of the Regulation, a new provision of the regulation would allow a Director to require a facility to consider ‘non-normal’ operating scenarios by way of a notice. This is particularly important for discharges of contaminants with the potential for acute health effects where effects may occur over a short-term exposure or where operating conditions are occurring frequently. In addition a new order provision would require a facility to model a specific incident that has occurred (e.g. a malfunction). 

This proposal in its entirety will aid in the prevention of incidents that have the potential for adverse effects caused by the release of contaminants. This proposal will potentially lead to reduction of emissions of sulphur dioxide and improved local air quality near petroleum refineries (e.g. primarily in the Sarnia area).

Summary

After consultation on the proposed amendments and the proposed new/updated air standards, the ministry's intent is to arrive at a decision regarding the science-based standards and other proposed amendments. The standards and other proposed amendments would then be incorporated into O. Reg. 419/05. The ministry will also update the document "Ontario's Ambient Air Quality Criteria" and the document “The Air Contaminants Benchmarks (ACB) List: Standards, guidelines and screening levels for assessing point of impingement concentrations of air contaminants". Other guidance documents that are affected by this proposal may also be updated or introduced to reflect the final decisions.

Other information

Sulphur dioxide

The proposal includes amendments to Schedule 6 for Upper Risk Thresholds (URTs) for Sulphur Dioxide. An Upper Risk Threshold (URT) is determined for each contaminant in that Schedule for the purposes of Section 30 (Requirements if a URT may be exceeded) and Section 35 (Site-Specific Standards) of O. Reg. 419/05. The URT is a concentration of a contaminant in air, set above the general air standard. URTs are risk management values based on consideration of scientific information. The framework for establishing, implementing and assessing URTs was established through consultation with stakeholders including public health associations and industry and is described in the Guideline for Implementation of Air Standards in Ontario (GIASO).

Generally, a URT is set as a multiple of a given standard. For substances with non-carcinogenic effects, the URT is set 10-fold higher than the standard. For substances with carcinogenic effects, the URT is set as 100-fold higher than the standard. However, the setting of a URT may also include consideration of other effects that may be of concern at higher exposure levels and/or acknowledgment of current Ontario air standards for the compound, and this information may be used to adjust from the default levels. Such information was considered in setting the URT for SO2. Specifically, since the current air standard for SO2 is representative of a concentration which is protective against adverse health effects on the general population but not sensitive populations, the URT is proposed to be set at the level of the current SO2 air standards, namely:

  • a 1-hour URT of 690 μg/m3 (micrograms per cubic metre of air) for Sulphur Dioxide, for facilities where section 20 applies.
  • a ½ hour URT of 830 μg/m3 (micrograms per cubic metre of air) for Sulphur Dioxide, for facilities where section 19 applies.

Generally, URTs under O. Reg. 419/05 are not phased-in. Hence, there is no phase-in period proposed for the proposed sulphur dioxide URTs.

The current Schedule 2 air standard for Sulphur Dioxide will continue to apply to facilities where Section 19 applies until they are phased out on February 1, 2020. Air standards referenced in O. Reg. 419/05 can be used directly as compliance and enforcement tools and apply to stationary sources only. Dispersion modelling, as referenced in the Regulation, is used to relate emission rates from a source to resulting point of impingement concentrations of a particular contaminant.

O. Reg. 419/05 details, among other things, modelling requirements for approved dispersion models, Emission Summary Dispersion Modelling (ESDM) report requirements, notification requirements, phase-in timelines and general prohibitions against exceeding the standards listed in the Schedules to the Regulation. For more information, see the ministry website Rules on Air Quality and Pollution.

Public consultation

This proposal was posted for a 45 day public review and comment period starting October 27, 2017. Comments were to be received by December 11, 2017.

All comments received during the comment period are being considered as part of the decision-making process by the Ministry.

Please Note: All comments and submissions received have become part of the public record.

Other public consultation opportunities

Sulphur dioxide

In April 2016, the ministry distributed the “Science Discussion Document on the Development of Air Standards for Sulphur Dioxide (SO2)” (MOECC, 2016). The ministry requested scientific input regarding the toxicological information examined by the ministry and, comments on the strengths and weaknesses of the possible paths towards the development of the AAQCs and air standards for SO2. On May 11, 2016, the ministry hosted a Pre-consultation Science Meeting with interested stakeholders at 40 St. Clair Ave West, Toronto (attachment 6). A follow-up meeting was held on July 28, 2016, at 135 St. Clair Ave West, Toronto. During and following the meeting, the ministry received oral and written comments from representatives from some First Nations communities as well as from stakeholders, representing industry, public health, environmental groups and consulting firms. There was a general consensus from these meetings that both a short-term (acute) AAQC would be developed to address potential acute human health concerns, and an additional long-term (chronic) AAQC would be developed to address potential ecological health concerns associated with vegetation effects.

The information gleaned from this consultation has informed the finalization of the “Science Discussion Document on the Development of Air Standards for Sulphur Dioxide (SO2)” (attachment 1) and used to support the “Rationale for the development of Ontario Air Standards for Sulphur Dioxide (SO2)” (attachment 2).

Transitional operating conditions

Guideline A10: Procedure for Preparing an Emission Summary and Dispersion Modelling (ESDM) Report provides guidance that supplements O. Reg. 419/05. On December 18, 2015, the ministry posted on the Environmental Registry proposed changes to the Procedure and noted in chapter 8.3 that it was working to clarify guidance to address the type of TOC that should be considered in modelling and included in an ESDM report.

On March 8, 2017, along with several other documents that support the implementation of the O. Reg. 419/05, the Procedure was updated (EBR Decision 012-4167) and took effect immediately. Chapter 8.3 of the Procedure was not updated at the time as the draft guidance was still under review. The ministry has decided to propose regulatory amendments instead of solely updating the ESDM Procedure guidance. The current guidance will be updated as needed to reflect the outcome of this consultation process.

Supporting materials

View materials in person

You can view supporting materials in person. Some are not available online because of ownership rights or for accessibility reasons.

Get in touch with the contact person listed below to find out what materials are available.

You can view them in person at these locations:

Standards Development Branch
Address

40 St. Clair Avenue West
Floor 7
Toronto ON M4V 1M2
Canada

Office phone number
West Central Regional Office
Address

119 King Street West
Floor 12
Hamilton ON L8P 4Y7
Canada

Office phone number

Comment

Commenting is now closed.

This consultation was open from October 27, 2017
to December 11, 2017

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